Maybe Jesus was as the Gospel says, “out of his mind.”

The gospel reading prescribed for this Sunday (Mark 3:20-35) paints a daunting picture of the perceptions of the people of Jesus’ hometown. The folks who knew Jesus, including his family worried that he might just be “out of his mind.” This is indeed a contrast to the ways in which Jesus is typically portrayed. This is a dangerous Jesus who ran the risk of being perceived as deranged. In his book “The Underground Church: Reclaiming the Subversive Way of Jesus” Robin Meyers captures some of this danger when he points to Mary Oliver’s poem “Maybe” in which Jesus’ “melancholy madness” is seen by his fellows as more dangerous than a storm.  Safely ensconced in our imaginations, Jesus is rarely allowed to threaten the status quo to which we cling for dear life. Are we prepared for the stormy waters that would be stirred up should we take Jesus at his word? Maybe…

Maybe Mary Oliver pastordawn

Maybe Jesus was as the Gospel says, “out of his mind.”

The gospel reading prescribed for this coming Sunday (Mark 3:20-35) paints a daunting picture of the perceptions of the people of Jesus’ hometown. The folks who knew Jesus, including his family worried that he might just be “out of his mind.” This is indeed a contrast to the ways in which Jesus is typically portrayed. This is a dangerous Jesus who ran the risk of being perceived as deranged. In his book “The Underground Church: Reclaiming the Subversive Way of Jesus” Robin Meyers captures some of this danger when he points to Mary Oliver’s poem “Maybe” in which Jesus’ “melancholy madness” is seen by his fellows as more dangerous than a storm.  Safely ensconced in our imaginations, Jesus is rarely allowed to threaten the status quo to which we cling for dear life. Are we prepared for the stormy waters that would be stirred up should we take Jesus at his word? Maybe…

Maybe Mary Oliver pastordawn

Faith as Resistance: Adult Education Class

Spiritual DefianceCurrently the Adult Education Class at Holy Cross Lutheran Church is exploring ways in which the church can once again become communities of resistance. We began with an exploration of Cynthia Moe-Lobeda’s book “Resisting Structural Evil Love As Ecological-Economic Vocation” and we have moved on to the excellent work of Robin Meyers whose Beecher Lectures have been published in “Spiritual Defiance: Building a Beloved Community of Resistance”. Below you will find the 3rd lecture in the series, UNDONE: Faith as Resistance to Empire, which we are studying in depth. For those who would like to delve deeper all three Beecher Lectures, along with a brief bio of Robin Meyers, can be found here 

Join us for conversation at 9:15am this Sunday 

UNDONE: Faith as Resistance to Ego, Orthodoxy and Empire: Robin Meyers

Underground churchRobin Meyers gives the 2013 Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School. “The three lectures, given by Meyers, are entitled “UNDONE: Faith as Resistance to Ego, Orthodoxy, and Empire.” Instead of conceiving of the church as an institution that promotes faith as a belief system, defending doctrinal claims as essential to salvation and good works, UCC pastor and author Robin Meyers will make the case that the Jesussaving church Movement was in the beginning, and must be again, a Beloved Community of Resistance. Confronting our illusions with help from Kierkegaard, and drawing the poetry of Anna Kamienska, each lectures will focus on three areas that demand resistance: ministry as performance (ego), ministry as right belief and worship (orthodoxy), and ministry as sentimental surrender to the status quo (Empire).”

“Church: A Nine Pound Sparrow that is Afraid to Fly”

sparrowAt the beginning of his latest book, “The Underground Church: Reclaiming the Subversive Jesus”,  Robin Meyers quotes  Fred Craddock to ask how the church became a nine pound sparrow that is afraid to fly? Questioning the domestication of what was once an underground church, Meyers bemoans the church’s current state ofunderground church domestication and sentimentality. I’ve blogged about Meyer’s before and highly recommended his earlier book: “Saving Jesus from the Church: How to Stop Worshiping Christ and Start Following Jesus.” I have just re-read both books and I think that they are must-reads for anyone who cares about the future of Christianity. Watch this brief video for a sample of Meyers dreams for the subversive way toward the Reign of God where everyone has enough.

The Underground Church – Robin Meyers

underground churchSince reading his book “Saving Jesus From the Church:  How to Stop Worshiping Christ and Start Following Jesus” I have been a regular listener of Robin Meyers’ weekly sermonsaving Jesus posts. So it was with great eagerness that I snapped up a copy of his latest book “The Underground Church: Reclaiming the Subversive Way of Jesus”. Meyers is a dangerous follower of the radical teaching of Jesus who calls the church to be leaven in the world and move beyond notions of conservative and liberal christianity.